Nursem skincare review

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*DISCLAIMER* *AD*

I was kindly gifted these from Nursem to use and post about if I wanted to, here is my blog post review with a discount code and there is also an Instagram post.

About Nursem

Nursem was set up by Antonia, a paediatric nurse, and her husband Jonny after Antonia encountered problems with cracked and sore skin on her hands due to extensive hand washing. But this is a product with a difference: Nursem provide a promise – for every product sold they give a months worth of Nursem to a nurse or midwife who have been registered onto their waiting list (products are sent to UK health centres or ward addresses).

I have to admit that I am really lazy when it comes to moisturising my hands. And I know that I should do it regularly, especially considering how many times we wash our hands every day but I have never really considered the importance of this. I’m fortunate enough to have not experienced any problems with my skin due to handwashing but I know plenty of other student nurses/nurses who have. I am currently on placement and wanted to use the product for a few weeks to fully see any benefits from moisturising regularly.

I received the caring hand cream and the caring hand fix. I have taken the caring hand cream with me to placement and applied throughout the day, using the caring hand fix on a nighttime before bed. I didn’t think my hands were dry before but I have noticed a difference in the way they feel since I started using this product regularly. The skin around my nails is a lot softer and I find that I am not experiencing any dry cuticles which was an issue I had encountered before. The cream is non-greasy and does not have a strong smell. The packaging is simple but eye catching, you would easily spot it on a shelf in a store. The colours stand out and work well together.

I love the idea behind the Nursem promise and would encourage everyone to nominate a nurse/midwife or a placement that you feel should be on their waiting list!

If you would like to purchase any of the products yourself, Nursem have kindly set up a 25% discount code for you to use.

Enter FLAMINGCOPPER at the checkout!

Let me know what you think to the product if you do purchase some!

Love,

T x

*Book Review* Leadership for Nursing, Health and Social Care Students

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DISCLAIMER: This book was gifted to me to review. I have previously reviewed other books from the same publishers, which you can read here and here.

 

Beginning year 3 was daunting for me, especially after talking to my mentor on my last placement of year 2 about developing my leadership skills ready for my management placement in the second half of year 3. I really looked forward to reading and reviewing this textbook as I wanted to see if I could gain some tips that would aid my leadership and delegation skills going through year 3. The book itself is part of a new series of books called Essentials and aims to provide an insight into the world of leadership.

The book has a number of chapters, all focusing on different areas regarding leadership. One chapter focuses on theories of leadership, with the next chapter focusing on the skills and qualities needed to be an effective leader.

 

In chapter one, the authors discuss what leadership is and why it is so important in health and social care. I find this chapter a good insight into what the whole book will discuss and would be useful to use in any leadership or management module as well.

Throughout the book, there are scenarios which allow you to explore your own thoughts and ideas around leadership and how you would approach different situations within practice.

At the end of the book, there are full references used within the book which students may find useful for further reading and as sources of information for leadership modules at university.

In chapter 7, the history of healthcare and social care within the UK is discussed. I found this chapter really interesting to see how healthcare has changed and developed over time. The chapter also describes why having knowledge of government policy is important in today’s healthcare environment and I would suggest this is a must-read section for any student nurse, especially third years preparing to qualify and take their first newly qualified post.

The learning outcomes before each chapter are recapped at the end, which allows anyone reading the book to utilise each chapter and ensure they have understood the information contained within the chapter. I believe this book will help me to develop my leadership skills and give me a background knowledge on how leadership can be influenced by other factors and the skills needed to be an effective leader within my own career, which I feel every student reading this book would benefit from.

The book is written in an easy-to-read way, whilst containing a good amount of knowledge and information for students in any year of a degree course.

Love,

T x

How to use Discord

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As you may have seen, I have created a server on Discord called the Student Nurse Academy. This server is for all student nurses and newly qualified nurses to get involved with. There are text chat rooms where you can ask advice and support on things such as assignments and placements, allowing you to receive real-time support from other student nurses. You can also chat socially with other student nurses from around the world! I know that many of you may not have been on Discord before so I have created this step by step guide on how to use it that I hope you will find useful!

  1. Create a Discord account – download the app on your phone or computer and choose a username (you can change this later on). Remember to verify your email to allow you full access to the servers chat rooms.
  2. Customise your account – you’ve verified your email address and now you’re good to go! Add a profile picture of your choice and connect apps such as Facebook or Spotify if you wish to do so! blog picture 2
  3. Join the server – you can join the server through the invite link, this takes you straight to the introductions chat for you to tell us a little bit about yourself! Your servers will appear on the left hand side of the screen.blog picture 1
  4. Start chatting! – join one of the chat rooms on the left hand side of your screen and write a message. All the chat rooms are text chats, except coffee club which is a voice channel. You can jump in there and chat with other student nurses, kind of like a big Skype call 😂 If you don’t feel comfortable using the voice channel, stick to the text chats! If the chat names appear in bold, this means there are messages in there you have not seen.blog picture 3
  5. Build friendships – the main aim of this server is to bring student nurses together and to create friendships. Asking for advice is important and a part of this server, but gaining a support network is the main aim. You can chat about anything you want to in the general chit-chat ward, from what pets you have to what Harry Potter house you belong to (I’m a Slytherin for anyone interested 😂). I’ve made many friends through social media and want to help make this a possibility for other student nurses.

Why not use Facebook/Twitter/Instagram like we are now?

I wanted to create an area where student nurses can just chat, a little bit like a Whatsapp group but without needing to share your phone number with ‘strangers’. Twitter/Facebook/Instagram require a little bit of work from yourself to start conversations, you need to post a status, tweet or picture for people to interact with, that’s if your friends see them with the current algorithms. Here on Discord, you can just jump into a chat and join in. Discord is a safe place where you don’t even need to divulge the university you study at if you do not wish to. Discord is easy to use and you don’t even need to receive notifications if you’re easily distracted like me. Pop in and out of the chats whenever you want to and interact with people. You can @username to direct a message towards a specific user and react to people’s messages. You don’t even need to download an app, you can just use this when on a computer through the web interface.

Feel free to ask any questions you may have!

Love,

T x

You must work on a ward…..

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This age-old narrative is rearing its head again and again. ‘I want to work in the community but people say I must work on a ward for at least a year’, ‘I want to specialise as a newly qualified nurse (NQN) but some say I should work on a ward first to hone my skills’ and such nonsense is heard and seen every single day in university or on social media. I feel that statements like this are dampening the dreams of student nurses for no real reason.

NEWS FLASH!

There is no reason to work on a general medicine ward first before moving on to another post if you do not want to. Yes you will develop your skills as a NQN and build your confidence during your preceptorship. BUT…the skill sets used in areas such as the community, in a GP surgery, theatres, a nursing home or in specialist areas such as critical care are very different to the skill set used on a general medicine ward. Contrary to belief, you will not ‘de-skill’ going into these areas!

So you spend a year on a general medicine ward and then move to the area you actually want to work in…and guess what? It’s like starting over again. You need to develop all the new skill sets and hone the ones you already have to your new area. Why not cut out the middle man and develop these from the beginning of your time as a NQN?

We spend a long and hard three years at university…why should we ‘settle’ for an area we know we don’t actually want to work in when we have fallen in love with an area that is right up our street? As a student nurse, or even a qualified nurse, the world is our oyster and we can apply to work in most areas now as a NQN, so if you have dreams of working in an area like critical care or a GP surgery there is nothing stopping you. There are more and more areas accepting applications from NQN now and I can only see this increasing in the future. If general medicine is your thing that’s fab, but for a lot of us working on a ward is not what we want to do and that’s fine as well. You are at work for a large portion of your week, why spend the time unhappy?

I am often criticised for wanting to go straight into critical care, I hear things like ‘it’s too specialised you’re not a good enough nurse as a NQN to work in such a specialist area’ or ‘why would you want to start in a place like that when you could spend a year on a ward first’. Working on a general ward is not for me, I’ve known this for a long time and it won’t change. Yes critical care is still a ward, but its a different kind of routine and style of nursing to general medicine wards.

Don’t be afraid to talk about where you would like to work, if someone attempts to shoot you down don’t feel like you need to explain yourself. The most important thing is finding the job that suits you and if this is in an area other than a ward, hold your head up high and know that you are making the right choice for you. Ultimately this is all that matters.

Nursing is not one size fits all and that’s the real beauty of it.

Love,

T x