*Book Review* Being a nurse by Lauren Philpott

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*DISCLAIMER* This book was gifted for me to review, I have previously worked with the publishers before which you can see here and here.

Lauren is a children’s nurse who qualified in 2014. Lauren runs a blog called Graduation to Revalidation which talks about how to survive your first 3 years as a qualified nurse and you can find her on twitter at @grad2revalnurse. Lauren wrote the book after looking for other books which described the way newly qualified nurses feel and finding there were none available.

Lauren writes in a way that is like talking to a friend or mentor, making you feel comfortable and supported. The book contains sections on how to cope with a bad day and first day nerves. As a third year student nurse, I worry about first day nerves especially as I am going to work in a trust that I haven’t had a placement in and this section of the book really resonated with me as I’m sure it will other third year student nurses.

The book is written in an informative way without using jargon and confusing language, containing hints and tips from Lauren herself on each section. My favourite section is how you know when you’re ready to progress, I have a career plan which I would like to stick to and this section was really interesting to read.

This is a book that would be good for all student nurses to read, especially third years who are close to qualifying or newly qualified nurses!

Love,

T x

*Book Review* Leadership for Nursing, Health and Social Care Students

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DISCLAIMER: This book was gifted to me to review. I have previously reviewed other books from the same publishers, which you can read here and here.

 

Beginning year 3 was daunting for me, especially after talking to my mentor on my last placement of year 2 about developing my leadership skills ready for my management placement in the second half of year 3. I really looked forward to reading and reviewing this textbook as I wanted to see if I could gain some tips that would aid my leadership and delegation skills going through year 3. The book itself is part of a new series of books called Essentials and aims to provide an insight into the world of leadership.

The book has a number of chapters, all focusing on different areas regarding leadership. One chapter focuses on theories of leadership, with the next chapter focusing on the skills and qualities needed to be an effective leader.

 

In chapter one, the authors discuss what leadership is and why it is so important in health and social care. I find this chapter a good insight into what the whole book will discuss and would be useful to use in any leadership or management module as well.

Throughout the book, there are scenarios which allow you to explore your own thoughts and ideas around leadership and how you would approach different situations within practice.

At the end of the book, there are full references used within the book which students may find useful for further reading and as sources of information for leadership modules at university.

In chapter 7, the history of healthcare and social care within the UK is discussed. I found this chapter really interesting to see how healthcare has changed and developed over time. The chapter also describes why having knowledge of government policy is important in today’s healthcare environment and I would suggest this is a must-read section for any student nurse, especially third years preparing to qualify and take their first newly qualified post.

The learning outcomes before each chapter are recapped at the end, which allows anyone reading the book to utilise each chapter and ensure they have understood the information contained within the chapter. I believe this book will help me to develop my leadership skills and give me a background knowledge on how leadership can be influenced by other factors and the skills needed to be an effective leader within my own career, which I feel every student reading this book would benefit from.

The book is written in an easy-to-read way, whilst containing a good amount of knowledge and information for students in any year of a degree course.

Love,

T x

You must work on a ward…..

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This age-old narrative is rearing its head again and again. ‘I want to work in the community but people say I must work on a ward for at least a year’, ‘I want to specialise as a newly qualified nurse (NQN) but some say I should work on a ward first to hone my skills’ and such nonsense is heard and seen every single day in university or on social media. I feel that statements like this are dampening the dreams of student nurses for no real reason.

NEWS FLASH!

There is no reason to work on a general medicine ward first before moving on to another post if you do not want to. Yes you will develop your skills as a NQN and build your confidence during your preceptorship. BUT…the skill sets used in areas such as the community, in a GP surgery, theatres, a nursing home or in specialist areas such as critical care are very different to the skill set used on a general medicine ward. Contrary to belief, you will not ‘de-skill’ going into these areas!

So you spend a year on a general medicine ward and then move to the area you actually want to work in…and guess what? It’s like starting over again. You need to develop all the new skill sets and hone the ones you already have to your new area. Why not cut out the middle man and develop these from the beginning of your time as a NQN?

We spend a long and hard three years at university…why should we ‘settle’ for an area we know we don’t actually want to work in when we have fallen in love with an area that is right up our street? As a student nurse, or even a qualified nurse, the world is our oyster and we can apply to work in most areas now as a NQN, so if you have dreams of working in an area like critical care or a GP surgery there is nothing stopping you. There are more and more areas accepting applications from NQN now and I can only see this increasing in the future. If general medicine is your thing that’s fab, but for a lot of us working on a ward is not what we want to do and that’s fine as well. You are at work for a large portion of your week, why spend the time unhappy?

I am often criticised for wanting to go straight into critical care, I hear things like ‘it’s too specialised you’re not a good enough nurse as a NQN to work in such a specialist area’ or ‘why would you want to start in a place like that when you could spend a year on a ward first’. Working on a general ward is not for me, I’ve known this for a long time and it won’t change. Yes critical care is still a ward, but its a different kind of routine and style of nursing to general medicine wards.

Don’t be afraid to talk about where you would like to work, if someone attempts to shoot you down don’t feel like you need to explain yourself. The most important thing is finding the job that suits you and if this is in an area other than a ward, hold your head up high and know that you are making the right choice for you. Ultimately this is all that matters.

Nursing is not one size fits all and that’s the real beauty of it.

Love,

T x