The mentor that changed everything

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This post does not by any means suggest that my other mentors haven’t been amazing, because they have. I have been extremely lucky that every mentor I have worked with up to now have taught me so much and have always been fantastic to work with. There is just one mentor who changed everything for me.

Rewind back to the end of year 1, to me receiving my first placement allocation for year 2 and seeing HDU/ITU. I hadn’t been on an acute ward in my training yet and I was starting my acute experiences in one of the scariest places, A&E being another one that fills me with dread.

I spent weeks panicking (a common occurrence with me as you will know if you’ve read my other blogs¬†ūüėā) and worrying that I really did not know enough to be trusted with this kind of placement. I was going from year 1, in a placement that I was actually quite confident in due to previous experience to my first acute ward. I did not have chance to visit the unit before starting placement so I walked in ‘blind’. The first thing I saw was all the machines and I must have looked terrified because one of the NQNs said ‘It’s not that scary once you get started, don’t look so terrified you will be fine!’. I met my mentor and she took me into handover. From the first moment she was welcoming and kind, I instantly warmed to her and felt a little less nervous. I picked up the handover sheet and was convinced it was in another language, I didn’t understand half of the actual handover and worried that this would happen every morning.

I started my placement with 2 weeks on HDU, so the ratio of patients is 2:1. My mentor started by showing me the crash trolley and the airway trolley. We then moved onto the bedside checks and the observation charts. By lunchtime, I was feeling confident enough to record the observations myself and my mentor was happy for me to do so. The next week passed so quickly and my mentor knew so much, the knowledge she had blew me away and I remember thinking to myself that I would never know all the things that she knew. At the end of my second week, I had 2 weeks annual leave for Easter. When I returned, I was on ITU.

I asked over and over if I was doing ok, if I was where I should be and was doing everything I should be. I was doubting myself as I always do and thought I didn’t know anything. My mentor encouraged me all the time to complete skills that she knew I could do, she had faith in me and taught me things that have since come in very handy on my other placements. The day she told me I was having my own level 2 patient in ITU, I remember thinking no, no way I’m not good enough. This is not happening I will mess this up big time. And guess what? I didn’t! I felt confident in the bedside checks and the observations, she provided me with support and encouragement and actually made me believe that I can do this. The next few days passed and I became more confident with everything, using my own initiative to complete tasks that I could do. Then my mentor said I was taking care of a level 3 patient. WHAT?! No, no thank you I do not know what to do and the ventilator scares me to death¬†ūüėā¬†Of course I wasn’t on my own I had her supervision but I was allowed to complete tasks by myself, keep track of medication times and assess changes to care based on ABGs. She pushed me to make decisions based on my own knowledge without ever making me feel ‘belittled’ if I didn’t know anything or needed to check something.

Before this placement, I had absolutely no faith in myself at all and thought I wouldn’t make it as a nurse. This mentor completely changed my way of thinking. She showed me so much support and encouragement that it was impossible to continue doubting myself. She taught me so much and I genuinely think that if I become even half the nurse she is, I will be very lucky. She constantly made sure that I was feeling comfortable and gave me every learning opportunity, involving me in ward rounds and procedures such as intubations and tracheostomy procedures. I felt welcomed from day 1 and completely fell in love with the place, which is partly due to my mentor and the faith she had in me. The feedback she gave me made me cry and I always look back on it if I’m doubting myself and feeling low. To reiterate, I can say that I’m very lucky and all my mentors have been fantastic and I’ve learnt so much from them all, but there was something different about this woman. In 6 weeks, she took me from a nervous second year student believing she would never be a nurse – to a semi-confident (only because I’ll never be fully confident!) second year knowing that she could do this and that there was a good chance that she would qualify! I now feel slightly jealous of anyone who receives that placement in the time we have left on the course¬†ūüėā

Let me know any stories you have of mentors like this!

Love,

T x

Common equipment used in critical care

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Monitor РEvery patient requires a monitor which allows for continuous monitoring of observations. These include blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate and oxygen saturations, CO² and temperature can also be added on to the monitor.

Ventilator – A ventilator can assist patients’ with their own breathing, or completely take over the control of a patients’ breathing. This allows their body to rest and recuperate. The patient will either have an endotracheal tube or a tracheostomy. A tracheostomy tube allows the patient to receive full support whilst awake. If the patient has an endotracheal tube, they will be sedated.

Arterial line – An arterial line is inserted into an artery and this enables constant monitoring of blood pressure, through being connected to the monitor. They also allow access for frequent blood samples and ABGs. The arterial line can be inserted into the radial, brachial, femoral or pedal artery. The most common ones I saw in critical care were radial ones. The arterial line is sutured to the skin to keep it in place.

Central line – A central line is an intravenous line, inserted into one of the larger veins in the body. They are mainly used for administering medications, IV fluids are also given through central lines. Central lines are usually inserted into the jugular vein, but they can also be inserted into the femoral or subclavian veins.

endotracheal-tube-500x500Endotracheal tube – This is a plastic tube that is used during mechanical ventilation. The tube is inserted into the patient’s trachea, often the tube will be cut to a size recommended by the Dr carrying out the intubation.¬†A¬†bougie¬†may be used to guide the insertion of the tube. Once inserted, the tube will be attached to the ventilator via ventilator piping. There is a cuff on these tubes that will be inflated to prevent movement of the tube, cuff pressure is checked regularly to ensure there are no leaks.

Indwelling urinary catheter – All patients within critical care will have a urinary catheter in place. This is to ensure accurate monitoring of urine output for the patients fluid balance records. Urine output will usually be recorded every hour.

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Vas Cath –¬†A vas cath is a specialised central line that is used only for dialysis. Placed in the jugular, femoral or subclavian veins. I only saw one of these in my time on critical care and it was placed in the femoral vein.

 

Product_PicWindow_Carefeed-AdultNasogastric tube РThis is a flexible tube that is inserted through the nose and down into the stomach. The NG tube can be used to provide nutrition via a ng feed and to administer certain medications. The NG tube is aspirated regularly to check if the patient is absorbing the ng feed and to test the ph level of any aspirations collected. The position of the NG tube should be checked and recorded regularly by measuring the length of the tube visible. Before using the NG tube, the guide wire should always be removed.

tracoe-twist-ref-301-tracheostomy-tubeTracheostomy tube – A small tube placed into a hole made in the neck, allowing access to the trachea. A tracheostomy is used when a patient is being weaned from ventilator support. These are temporary and will be removed when the patient no longer needs them. The inner tubes are cleaned every 4 hours.

Intravenous infusion pumps – Used for any medication that is administered through a central line. The amount of medication infused every hour is recorded on the fluid balance chart. These are the ones used in my trust, others may vary.

 

Let me know if you’ve seen any other equipment on your critical care placements!

Love,

T x

 

 

Common medications used in critical care

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I often see posts from students who have received placement allocations in critical care and are wondering what to read up on. Here are a list of the most common medications used in critical care that I hope others may find useful.

Sodium Chloride 0.9% (also known as normal saline) – every patient will usually have this on ITU, it is a source of water and electrolytes. Used for replenishing fluid and restoring/maintaining the concentrations of sodium and chloride ions.

Hartmanns fluid –¬†used to replace body fluid and mineral salts. A mixture of sodium chloride, sodium lactate, potassium chloride and calcium chloride in water.

Propofol – sedation used in ITU for critically ill patients on ventilators. Propofol is given continuously via IV infusion.

Alfentanil – used as an opioid analgesia. Suppresses respiratory activity in patients receiving invasive ventilation. Acts within 1-2 minutes and has a short duration of action. Often used alongside sedation such as Propofol.

Noradrenaline – a vasoconstrictor used to treat hypotension. Norad is administered continuously via IV infusion into a central line.

Atracurium – a muscle relaxant used to paralyse. Dose is calculated on patients’ ideal body weight, not actual body weight. Able to be used in patients’ with hepatic or renal impairment due to the way it metabolises. Atracurium relaxes the vocal cords to allow intubation.

Vasopressin –¬†often used as support for other vasoconstrictors, such as norad.

Ranitidine – reduces gastric acid output. Ranitidine is mainly used to stop stomach acid coming up from the stomach while the patient is under anaesthetic or sedation. It can also help to clear up infections within the stomach, when taken with antibiotics.

Remifentanil –¬†used for sedation. Has a shorter onset duration than Alfentanil. Remi is often used overnight for patients who are not quite ready for extubation.

Digoxin Рis a cardiac glycoside which increases the force of myocardial contraction and reduces conductivity within AV node. Digoxin helps make the heart beat with a more regular rhythm. Digoxin is used to treat atrial fibrillation.

Quetiapine – antipsychotic. Used for the treatment of ‘mania’ episodes.

Haloperidol – antipsychotic. Mainly used to ease agitation or restlessness in elderly patients.

Furosemide – diuretic. Used in critical care to offload a large positive fluid balance or if the patient is not passing an adequate amount of urine per hour.

Aminophylline – used to treat reversible airway obstructions.¬† Aminophylline is usually given via IV infusion and is used to treat the acute symptoms of asthma, bronchitis, emphysema, and other lung diseases. Will often be given to patients who become ‘wheezy’ if nebulisers do not appear to be helping.¬†Aminophylline¬†belongs to a group of medicines known as bronchodilators.

Clonidine – used as a sedative agent when weaning patients off stronger sedation.

Tinzaparin –¬†¬†an anticoagulant used to prevent blood clots in patients with reduced mobility. As the patients in critical care are often sedated and bed bound, all patients will be administered tinzaparin or a variant of this.

Antibiotics –¬†The common ones used are Co-Amoxiclav, Tazocin, Meropenum and Clindamycin.

Love,

T x

 

Information was collated through talking to consultants, critical care nurses and further research through the BNF.